diff --git a/articles/discord.html b/articles/discord.html index 1d93966..4eff0d0 100755 --- a/articles/discord.html +++ b/articles/discord.html @@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd"> - + **Discord** : an internet cancer @@ -11,14 +11,14 @@ - +

Discord : an internet cancer

-
-

Preamble

-
+
+

Preamble

+

Before I start writing this article, I just want to clarify that I will NOT go over the technical aspect of Discord (such as the spyware and all) as it has been covered many times by other websites like This one !!!, but basically, it’s exactly how you expect it to be, spying, selling data, monitoring open processes, terrible electron based app….etc

@@ -28,9 +28,9 @@ I also wanted to make it clear that this is PURELY from my personal experience w

-
-

Chapter one : Curiosity

-
+
+

Chapter one : Curiosity

+

Picture yourself, it’s 2018/2019 and you are playing your favorite game, be it Minecraft, League of Legends, CS:GO, doesn’t matter. You start to play nicely, you make some friends, some enemies, typical gameplay. And then, one of them decides to take a step closer into your life, so they invite you to this cool new platform you have never heard about, Discord. Upon checking, you notice it’s a modern chat application for gamers…. “huh, must be nice” you might say. And then you are faced with a choice, you either create an account, or you don’t.

@@ -52,9 +52,9 @@ So you join that group they invited you to, it could be anything from a small fr

-
-

Chapter two : The hierarchy

-
+
+

Chapter two : The hierarchy

+

Now this hierarchy is not inherently bad, but this is how Discord (and even the communities on Discord) keep you addicted to them. When you join, you start as a peasant, a pleb, a noobie even. You have an ugly color for your username, and no access to “channels”, only few ones with cooldowns so you don’t talk much. And then you look at the members list, and you see a beautiful rainbow, people divided into categories, or roles as they like to call them!!

@@ -109,9 +109,9 @@ If you are paying attention, you would know that all of these will always end wi

-
-

Chapter three : Discord takes a once thriving community and splits it

-
+
+

Chapter three : Discord takes a once thriving community and splits it

+

Yes, there are always splits, and communities divide into multiple tiny sub-communities with their own opinions about useless matters. That is how you are kept invested. People love Drama, they love wars and they love picking sides.

@@ -133,9 +133,9 @@ So you basically killed a community, in 6 easy steps !!! And of course this will

-
-

Chapter four : Discord users are NOT your friends

-
+
+

Chapter four : Discord users are NOT your friends

+

Discord is made in a way that makes it easy to get attached to people, and also really hard to get rid of them, because you share the same servers, same friends, and the border between Private talk and Public talk is really blurred. Not to mention how hard, if not impossible it is to find someone who you met before but lost their contact. Because not only could they change their tag, but there is no way to search their username, and the servers can disappear from a minute to an other, or go private, or anything really !!! Now Shy actually talked about this issue on their article about Discord, but here I’m making a different point, in their article they say that it’s hard to get rid of someone you know via Discord, which is absolutely true. But it’s also easy to lost contact with someone literally in a split second, even people you deem “close” to you, they just…disappear!! So for y’all thinking about dating on Discord, that’s a terrible idea !!!! Imagine you’re in a Discord server, vibing with some awesome people, chatting about everything from the latest memes to the mysteries of the universe. You’ve become practically inseparable online pals, sharing inside jokes and bonding over your mutual hatred for pineapple on pizza. Life is grand, right? @@ -154,9 +154,9 @@ So, for those pondering the idea of Discord romance, think twice!

-
-

Final Chapter : Login-walls

-
+
+

Final Chapter : Login-walls

+

People have made this point before and i will make it again, but locking important information behind a log-in page, with no way to find them using a Google search is stupid at best and manipulative at worst, because in this situation. Not only are you putting your faith on Discord servers to not fail one day, but on server Owners to not delete their work (and potentially rare unrecoverable work from other users). Not to mention that you actually need to be in that server to even know of the existence of these kind of resources. Regardless of how you see it, this is just putting valuable info in the hands of random people who could easily lock them behind a specific role that can be obtained either by paying, or by stroking their digital e-penis !!!

@@ -182,9 +182,9 @@ In conclusion, Discord’s penchant for login-walls is like lo

-
-

Conclusion

-
+
+

Conclusion

+

In this digital adventure, we’ve explored the mysterious realm of Discord, a platform that’s both a blessing and a curse. It’s a place where friendships blossom and vanish like shooting stars, where power dynamics create hierarchies that keep you hooked, and where valuable information is locked away like a dragon’s hoard.

@@ -209,7 +209,7 @@ If you ever have more anecdotes, insights, or questions to add to this digital s

Author: Crystal

-

Created: 2023-11-01 Wed 20:09

+

Created: 2023-11-01 Wed 20:16

\ No newline at end of file diff --git a/favicon.png b/favicon.png new file mode 100644 index 0000000..9aac13b Binary files /dev/null and b/favicon.png differ diff --git a/index.html b/index.html index 6a9be8a..90063ac 100755 --- a/index.html +++ b/index.html @@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd"> - + Crystal's Website 💜 @@ -11,14 +11,14 @@ - +

Crystal’s Website 💜

-
-

Welcome to the wired

-
+
+

Welcome to the wired

+

Hi there, adorable you!

@@ -29,27 +29,27 @@ And welcome to my little corner of the internet, here I will be posting my rando -
+

Lain_chibi.png

-
-

Articles ( NEW !!!! )

-
+
+

Articles ( NEW !!!! )

+
-
-

root@localhost $ whoami

-
+
+

root@localhost $ whoami

+
-
-

About me :

-
+
+

About me :

+
  • Name : Crystal
  • Age : 18 years old
  • @@ -68,9 +68,9 @@ If you want to contact me (which would be really surprising) contact me via
-
-

About my Navi :

-
+ -
-

Sign my Guestbook (External website warning)

-
+
+

Sign my Guestbook (External website warning)

+

Want to leave a message, opinion, review or a salty insult ? Be sure to Sign my Guestbook then, it takes two seconds but it will mean the world to me !!!

-
+

sign_my_guestbook-anim.gif

-
-

Blinkies

-
+
+

Blinkies

+ -
-

My banner

-
+
+

My banner

+

If you enjoyed my website, you could link me on your personal website using this banner. If you don’t want to, then no pressure 💜 I still love you and I hope that this small shrine of mine will impress you in the future!!!

-
+

crystal-tilde.gif

-
-

Close this website, txEn eht nepO.(JAVASCRIPT WARNING)!!

+ -
-

Misc :

-
+
+

Misc :

+
  1. My University notes
@@ -160,7 +160,7 @@ If you enjoyed my website, you could link me on your personal website using this

Author: Crystal

-

Created: 2023-11-01 Wed 20:09

+

Created: 2023-11-01 Wed 20:15

\ No newline at end of file diff --git a/links.html b/links.html index c29229f..1fcb993 100755 --- a/links.html +++ b/links.html @@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd"> - + Close this website, txEn eht nepO.(JavaScript ahead) 💜 @@ -11,7 +11,7 @@ - +
@@ -26,9 +26,9 @@
-
-

Webrings & Links

-
+
+

Webrings & Links

+

This site is a proud member of the geekring! Check some other geeky websites here!

@@ -65,9 +65,9 @@ href="https://teethinvitro.neocities.org/webring/linuxring/script/onionring.css"
-
-

Lainchan Webring

-
+
+

Lainchan Webring

+

Lainring is a decentralized webring created by the users of Lainchan, an anonymous image board. If you want to be added, go to the Lainchan thread and post your website there, together with a 240x60 button image.

@@ -99,7 +99,7 @@ document.addEventListener("DOMContentLoaded", function(event) {

Author: Crystal

-

Created: 2023-11-01 Wed 20:09

+

Created: 2023-11-01 Wed 20:16

\ No newline at end of file diff --git a/src/org/articles/discord.org b/src/org/articles/discord.org index 500cfd9..7608f15 100755 --- a/src/org/articles/discord.org +++ b/src/org/articles/discord.org @@ -7,7 +7,7 @@ #+HTML_HEAD: #+OPTIONS: html-style:nil #+OPTIONS: toc:nil -#+HTML_HEAD: +#+HTML_HEAD: * Preamble diff --git a/src/org/index.org b/src/org/index.org index 439a055..90d5440 100755 --- a/src/org/index.org +++ b/src/org/index.org @@ -5,7 +5,7 @@ #+EXPORT_FILE_NAME: ../../index.html #+HTML_HEAD: #+HTML_HEAD: -#+HTML_HEAD: +#+HTML_HEAD: #+OPTIONS: html-style:nil #+OPTIONS: toc:nil * Welcome to the wired diff --git a/src/org/links.org b/src/org/links.org index a1033e6..93f819d 100755 --- a/src/org/links.org +++ b/src/org/links.org @@ -11,7 +11,7 @@ #+OPTIONS: title:nil #+HTML_LINK_HOME: https://crystal.tilde.institute/ #+HTML_LINK_UP: https://crystal.tilde.institute/ -#+HTML_HEAD: +#+HTML_HEAD: #+BEGIN_EXPORT html

diff --git a/src/org/uni_notes/algebra1.org b/src/org/uni_notes/algebra1.org index 79ab1af..bc4f529 100755 --- a/src/org/uni_notes/algebra1.org +++ b/src/org/uni_notes/algebra1.org @@ -11,7 +11,7 @@ #+HTML_LINK_HOME: https://crystal.tilde.institute/ #+HTML_LINK_UP: ../../../uni_notes/ #+OPTIONS: tex:imagemagick -#+HTML_HEAD: +#+HTML_HEAD: * Contenu de la Matiére ** Rappels et compléments (11H) - Logique mathématique et méthodes du raisonnement mathématique diff --git a/src/org/uni_notes/alsd1.org b/src/org/uni_notes/alsd1.org index 9b8e115..7f9397e 100755 --- a/src/org/uni_notes/alsd1.org +++ b/src/org/uni_notes/alsd1.org @@ -8,7 +8,7 @@ #+OPTIONS: html-style:nil #+OPTIONS: toc:4 #+HTML_LINK_HOME: https://crystal.tilde.institute/ -#+HTML_HEAD: +#+HTML_HEAD: #+HTML_LINK_UP: ../../../uni_notes/ #+OPTIONS: \n:y * Contenu de la Matiére diff --git a/src/org/uni_notes/analyse1.org b/src/org/uni_notes/analyse1.org index 152046b..545ef2d 100755 --- a/src/org/uni_notes/analyse1.org +++ b/src/org/uni_notes/analyse1.org @@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ #+HTML_LINK_UP: ../../../uni_notes/ #+OPTIONS: html-style:nil #+OPTIONS: toc:4 -#+HTML_HEAD: +#+HTML_HEAD: #+OPTIONS: \n:y * Contenu de la Matiére ** Chapitre 1 : Quelque propriétés de ℝ diff --git a/src/org/uni_notes/architecture1.org b/src/org/uni_notes/architecture1.org index 6c2d037..9891906 100755 --- a/src/org/uni_notes/architecture1.org +++ b/src/org/uni_notes/architecture1.org @@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ #+OPTIONS: toc:4 #+OPTIONS: \n:y #+HTML_LINK_HOME: https://crystal.tilde.institute/ -#+HTML_HEAD: +#+HTML_HEAD: #+HTML_LINK_UP: ../../../uni_notes/ * Premier cours : Les systémes de numération /Sep 27/ : diff --git a/uni_notes/algebra.html b/uni_notes/algebra.html index c42a1b5..0e223c5 100755 --- a/uni_notes/algebra.html +++ b/uni_notes/algebra.html @@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd"> - + Algebra 1 @@ -11,6 +11,7 @@ +
@@ -23,161 +24,161 @@

Table of Contents

-
-

Contenu de la Matiére

-
+
+

Contenu de la Matiére

+
-
-

Rappels et compléments (11H)

-
+
+

Rappels et compléments (11H)

+
  • Logique mathématique et méthodes du raisonnement mathématique
  • Ensembles et Relations
  • @@ -199,9 +200,9 @@
-
-

Structures Algébriques (11H)

-
+
+

Structures Algébriques (11H)

+
  • Groupes et morphisme de groupes
  • Anneaux et morphisme d’anneaux
  • @@ -209,9 +210,9 @@
-
-

Polynômes et fractions rationnelles

-
+
+

Polynômes et fractions rationnelles

+
  • Notion du polynôme à une indéterminée á coefficients dans un anneau
  • Opérations Algébriques sur les polynômes
  • @@ -224,9 +225,9 @@
-
-

Premier cours : Logique mathématique et méthodes du raisonnement mathématique Sep 25 :

-
+
+

Premier cours : Logique mathématique et méthodes du raisonnement mathématique Sep 25 :

+

Let P Q and R be propositions which can either be True or False. And let’s also give the value 1 to each True proposition and 0 to each false one.

@@ -576,13 +577,13 @@ A proposition is equivalent to another only when both of them have the same v Note: P implying Q is equivalent to P̅ implying Q̅, or: (P ⇒ Q) ⇔ (P̅ ⇒ Q̅)

-
-

Properties:

-
+
+

Properties:

+
-
-

Absorption:

-
+
+

Absorption:

+

(P ∨ P) ⇔ P

@@ -592,9 +593,9 @@ A proposition is equivalent to another only when both of them have the same v

-
-

Commutativity:

-
+
+

Commutativity:

+

(P ∧ Q) ⇔ (Q ∧ P)

@@ -604,9 +605,9 @@ A proposition is equivalent to another only when both of them have the same v

-
-

Associativity:

-
+
+

Associativity:

+

P ∧ (Q ∧ R) ⇔ (P ∧ Q) ∧ R

@@ -616,9 +617,9 @@ P ∨ (Q ∨ R) ⇔ (P ∨ Q) ∨ R

-
-

Distributivity:

-
+
+

Distributivity:

+

P ∧ (Q ∨ R) ⇔ (P ∧ Q) ∨ (P ∧ R)

@@ -628,9 +629,9 @@ P ∨ (Q ∧ R) ⇔ (P ∨ Q) ∧ (P ∨ R)

-
-

Neutral element:

-
+
+

Neutral element:

+

We define proposition T to be always true and F to be always false

@@ -644,9 +645,9 @@ P ∨ F ⇔ P

-
-

Negation of a conjunction & a disjunction:

-
+
+

Negation of a conjunction & a disjunction:

+

Now we won’t use bars here because my lazy ass doesn’t know how, so instead I will use not()!!!

@@ -664,25 +665,25 @@ not(P ∨ Q) ⇔ P̅ ∧ Q̅

-
-

Transitivity:

-
+
+

Transitivity:

+

[(P ⇒ Q) AND (Q ⇒ R)] ⇔ P ⇒ R

-
-

Contraposition:

-
+
+

Contraposition:

+

(P ⇒ Q) ⇔ (Q̅ ⇒ P̅)

-
-

God only knows what this property is called:

-
+
+

God only knows what this property is called:

+

If

@@ -709,17 +710,17 @@ Q is always true
-
-

Some exercices I found online :

-
+
+

Some exercices I found online :

+
-
-

USTHB 2022/2023 Section B :

-
+
+

USTHB 2022/2023 Section B :

+
    -
  • Exercice 1: Démontrer les équivalences suivantes:
    -
    +
  • Exercice 1: Démontrer les équivalences suivantes:
    +
    1. (P ⇒ Q) ⇔ (Q̅ ⇒ P̅)
      @@ -773,8 +774,8 @@ Literally the same as above 🩷

  • -
  • Exercice 2: Dire si les propositions suivantes sont vraies ou fausses, et les nier:
    -
    +
  • Exercice 2: Dire si les propositions suivantes sont vraies ou fausses, et les nier:
    +
    1. ∀x ∈ ℝ ,∃y ∈ ℝ*+, tels que e^x = y
      @@ -907,13 +908,13 @@ y + x < 8

-
-

2éme cours Oct 2

-
+
+

2éme cours Oct 2

+
-
-

Quantifiers

-
+
+

Quantifiers

+

A propriety P can depend on a parameter x

@@ -929,8 +930,8 @@ A propriety P can depend on a parameter x

    -
  • Example
    -
    +
  • Example
    +

    P(x) : x+1≥0

    @@ -941,13 +942,13 @@ P(X) is True or False depending on the values of x
-
-

Proprieties

-
+
+

Proprieties

+
    -
  • Propriety Number 1:
    -
    +
  • Propriety Number 1:
    +

    The negation of the universal quantifier is the existential quantifier, and vice-versa :

    @@ -958,8 +959,8 @@ The negation of the universal quantifier is the existential quantifier, and vice
    -
  • Example:
    -
    +
  • Example:
    +

    ∀ x ≥ 1 x² > 5 ⇔ ∃ x ≥ 1 x² < 5

    @@ -967,8 +968,8 @@ The negation of the universal quantifier is the existential quantifier, and vice
-
  • Propriety Number 2:
    -
    +
  • Propriety Number 2:
    +

    ∀x ∈ E, [P(x) ∧ Q(x)] ⇔ [∀ x ∈ E, P(x)] ∧ [∀ x ∈ E, Q(x)]

    @@ -979,8 +980,8 @@ The propriety “For any value of x from a set E , P(x) and Q(x)” is e

      -
    • Example :
      -
      +
    • Example :
      +

      P(x) : sqrt(x) > 0 ; Q(x) : x ≥ 1

      @@ -998,8 +999,8 @@ P(x) : sqrt(x) > 0 ; Q(x) : x ≥ 1
  • -
  • Propriety Number 3:
    -
    +
  • Propriety Number 3:
    +

    ∃ x ∈ E, [P(x) ∧ Q(x)] [∃ x ∈ E, P(x)] ∧ [∃ x ∈ E, Q(x)]

    @@ -1010,8 +1011,8 @@ P(x) : sqrt(x) > 0 ; Q(x) : x ≥ 1

      -
    • Example of why it’s NOT an equivalence :
      -
      +
    • Example of why it’s NOT an equivalence :
      +

      P(x) : x > 5 ; Q(x) : x < 5

      @@ -1024,8 +1025,8 @@ Of course there is no value of x such as its inferior and superior to 5 at the s
  • -
  • Propriety Number 4:
    -
    +
  • Propriety Number 4:
    +

    [∀ x ∈ E, P(x)] ∨ [∀ x ∈ E, Q(x)] ∀x ∈ E, [P(x) ∨ Q(x)]

    @@ -1039,16 +1040,16 @@ Of course there is no value of x such as its inferior and superior to 5 at the s
  • -
    -

    Multi-parameter proprieties :

    -
    +
    +

    Multi-parameter proprieties :

    +

    A propriety P can depend on two or more parameters, for convenience we call them x,y,z…etc

      -
    • Example :
      -
      +
    • Example :
      +

      P(x,y): x+y > 0

      @@ -1064,8 +1065,8 @@ P(-2,-1) is a False one

    • -
    • WARNING :
      -
      +
    • WARNING :
      +

      ∀x ∈ E, ∃y ∈ F , P(x,y)

      @@ -1081,8 +1082,8 @@ Are different because in the first one y depends on x, while in the second one,

        -
      • Example :
        -
        +
      • Example :
        +

        ∀ x ∈ ℕ , ∃ y ∈ ℕ y > x -–— True

        @@ -1096,8 +1097,8 @@ Are different because in the first one y depends on x, while in the second one,
    -
  • Proprieties :
    -
    +
  • Proprieties :
    +
    1. not(∀x ∈ E ,∃y ∈ F P(x,y)) ⇔ ∃x ∈ E, ∀y ∈ F not(P(x,y))
    2. not(∃x ∈ E ,∀y ∈ F P(x,y)) ⇔ ∀x ∈ E, ∃y ∈ F not(P(x,y))
    3. @@ -1106,20 +1107,20 @@ Are different because in the first one y depends on x, while in the second one,
    -
    -

    Methods of mathematical reasoning :

    -
    +
    +

    Methods of mathematical reasoning :

    +
    -
    -

    Direct reasoning :

    -
    +
    +

    Direct reasoning :

    +

    To show that an implication P ⇒ Q is true, we suppose that P is true and we show that Q is true

      -
    • Example:
      -
      +
    • Example:
      +

      Let a,b be two Real numbers, we have to prove that a² + b² = 1 ⇒ |a + b| ≤ 2

      @@ -1162,9 +1163,9 @@ a²+b²=1 ⇒ |a + b| ≤ 2 Which is what we wanted to prove, therefor the im
    -
    -

    Reasoning by the Absurd:

    -
    +
    +

    Reasoning by the Absurd:

    +

    To prove that a proposition is True, we suppose that it’s False and we must come to a contradiction

    @@ -1175,8 +1176,8 @@ And to prove that an implication P ⇒ Q is true using the reasoning by the absu

      -
    • Example:
      -
      +
    • Example:
      +

      Prove that this proposition is correct using the reasoning by the absurd : ∀x ∈ ℝ* , sqrt(1+x²) ≠ 1 + x²/2

      @@ -1194,17 +1195,17 @@ sqrt(1+x²) = 1 + x²/2 ; 1 + x² = (1+x²/2)² ; 1 + x² = 1 + x^4/4 + x² ;
    -
    -

    Reasoning by contraposition:

    -
    +
    +

    Reasoning by contraposition:

    +

    If an implication P ⇒ Q is too hard to prove, we just have to prove not(Q) ⇒ not(P) is true !!! or in other words that both not(P) and not(Q) are true

    -
    -

    Reasoning by counter example:

    -
    +
    +

    Reasoning by counter example:

    +

    To prove that a proposition ∀x ∈ E, P(x) is false, all we have to do is find a single value of x from E such as not(P(x)) is true

    @@ -1212,20 +1213,20 @@ To prove that a proposition ∀x ∈ E, P(x) is false, all we have to do is find
    -
    -

    3eme Cours : Oct 9

    -
    +
    +

    3eme Cours : Oct 9

    +
    -
    -

    Reasoning by recurrence :

    -
    +
    +

    Reasoning by recurrence :

    +

    P is a propriety dependent of n ∈ ℕ. If for n0 ∈ ℕ P(n0) is true, and if for n ≥ n0 (P(n) ⇒ P(n+1)) is true. Then P(n) is true for n ≥ n0

      -
    • Example:
      -
      +
    • Example:
      +

      Let’s prove that ∀ n ≥ 1 , (n,k=1)Σk = [n(n+1)]/2

      @@ -1261,21 +1262,21 @@ For n ≥ 1. We assume that P(n) is true, OR : (n, k=1)Σk = n(n+1)/2. We
    -
    -

    4eme Cours : Chapitre 2 : Sets and Operations

    -
    +
    +

    4eme Cours : Chapitre 2 : Sets and Operations

    +
    -
    -

    Definition of a set :

    -
    +
    +

    Definition of a set :

    +

    A set is a collection of objects that share the sane propriety

    -
    -

    Belonging, inclusion, and equality :

    -
    +
    +

    Belonging, inclusion, and equality :

    +
    1. Let E be a set. If x is an element of E, we say that x belongs to E we write x ∈ E, and if it doesn’t, we write x ∉ E
    2. A set E is included in a set F if all elements of E are elements of F and we write E ⊂ F ⇔ (∀x , x ∈ E ⇒ x ∈ F). We say that E is a subset of F, or a part of F. The negation of this propriety is : E ⊄ F ⇔ ∃x , x ∈ E and x ⊄ F
    3. @@ -1284,13 +1285,13 @@ A set is a collection of objects that share the sane propriety
    -
    -

    Intersections and reunions :

    -
    +
    +

    Intersections and reunions :

    +
    -
    -

    Intersection:

    -
    +
    +

    Intersection:

    +

    E ∩ F = {x / x ∈ E AND x ∈ F} ; x ∈ E ∩ F ⇔ x ∈ F AND x ∈ F

    @@ -1301,9 +1302,9 @@ x ∉ E ∩ F ⇔ x ∉ E OR x ∉ F

    -
    -

    Union:

    -
    +
    +

    Union:

    +

    E ∪ F = {x / x ∈ E OR x ∈ F} ; x ∈ E ∪ F ⇔ x ∈ F OR x ∈ F

    @@ -1314,17 +1315,17 @@ x ∉ E ∪ F ⇔ x ∉ E AND x ∉ F

    -
    -

    Difference between two sets:

    -
    +
    +

    Difference between two sets:

    +

    E(Which is also written as : E - F) = {x / x ∈ E and x ∉ F}

    -
    -

    Complimentary set:

    -
    +
    +

    Complimentary set:

    +

    If F ⊂ E. E - F is the complimentary of F in E.

    @@ -1335,52 +1336,52 @@ FCE = {x /x ∈ E AND x ∉ F} ONLY WHEN F IS A SUBSET OF E

    -
    -

    Symmetrical difference

    -
    +
    +

    Symmetrical difference

    +

    E Δ F = (E - F) ∪ (F - E) ; = (E ∪ F) - (E ∩ F)

    -
    -

    Proprieties :

    -
    +
    +

    Proprieties :

    +

    Let E,F and G be 3 sets. We have :

    -
    -

    Commutativity:

    -
    +
    +

    Commutativity:

    +

    E ∩ F = F ∩ E
    E ∪ F = F ∪ E

    -
    -

    Associativity:

    -
    +
    +

    Associativity:

    +

    E ∩ (F ∩ G) = (E ∩ F) ∩ G
    E ∪ (F ∪ G) = (E ∪ F) ∪ G

    -
    -

    Distributivity:

    -
    +
    +

    Distributivity:

    +

    E ∩ (F ∪ G) = (E ∩ F) ∪ (E ∩ G)
    E ∪ (F ∩ G) = (E ∪ F) ∩ (E ∪ G)

    -
    -

    Lois de Morgan:

    -
    +
    +

    Lois de Morgan:

    +

    If E ⊂ G and F ⊂ G ;

    @@ -1390,33 +1391,33 @@ If E ⊂ G and F ⊂ G ;

    -
    -

    An other one:

    -
    +
    +

    An other one:

    +

    E - (F ∩ G) = (E-F) ∪ (E-G) ; E - (F ∪ G) = (E-F) ∩ (E-G)

    -
    -

    An other one:

    -
    +
    +

    An other one:

    +

    E ∩ ∅ = ∅ ; E ∪ ∅ = E

    -
    -

    And an other one:

    -
    +
    +

    And an other one:

    +

    E ∩ (F Δ G) = (E ∩ F) Δ (E ∩ G)

    -
    -

    And the last one:

    -
    +
    +

    And the last one:

    +

    E Δ ∅ = E ; E Δ E = ∅

    @@ -1424,16 +1425,16 @@ E Δ ∅ = E ; E Δ E = ∅
    -
    -

    5eme cours: L’ensemble des parties d’un ensemble Oct 16

    -
    +
    +

    5eme cours: L’ensemble des parties d’un ensemble Oct 16

    +

    Let E be a set. We define P(E) as the set of all parts of E : P(E) = {X/X ⊂ E}

    -
    -

    Notes :

    -
    +
    +

    Notes :

    +

    ∅ ∈ P(E) ; E ∈ P(E)

    @@ -1444,17 +1445,17 @@ cardinal E = n The number of terms in E , cardinal P(E) = 2^n The numb

    -
    -

    Examples :

    -
    +
    +

    Examples :

    +

    E = {a,b,c} ; P(E)={∅, {a}, {b}, {c}, {a,b}, {b,c}, {a,c}, {a,b,c}}

    -
    -

    Partition of a set :

    -
    +
    +

    Partition of a set :

    +

    We say that A is a partition of E if:

    @@ -1465,16 +1466,16 @@ We say that A is a partition of E if:
    -
    -

    Cartesian products :

    -
    +
    +

    Cartesian products :

    +

    Let E and F be two sets, the set EXF = {(x,y)/ x ∈ E AND y ∈ F} is called the Cartesian product of E and F

    -
    -

    Example :

    -
    +
    +

    Example :

    +

    A = {4,5} ; B= {4,5,6} ; AxB = {(4,4), (4,5), (4,6), (5,4), (5,5), (5,6)}

    @@ -1485,9 +1486,9 @@ BxA = {(4,4), (4,5), (5,4), (5,5), (6,4), (6,5)} ; Therefore AxB ≠ BxA

    -
    -

    Some proprieties:

    -
    +
    +

    Some proprieties:

    +
    1. ExF = ∅ ⇔ E=∅ OR F=∅
    2. ExF = FxE ⇔ E=F OR E=∅ OR F=∅
    3. @@ -1500,21 +1501,21 @@ BxA = {(4,4), (4,5), (5,4), (5,5), (6,4), (6,5)} ; Therefore AxB ≠ BxA
    -
    -

    Binary relations in a set :

    -
    +
    +

    Binary relations in a set :

    +
    -
    -

    Definition :

    -
    +
    +

    Definition :

    +

    Let E be a set and x,y ∈ E. If there exists a link between x and y, we say that they are tied by a relation R and we write xRy

    -
    -

    Proprieties :

    -
    +
    +

    Proprieties :

    +

    Let E be a set and R a relation defined in E

    @@ -1526,16 +1527,16 @@ Let E be a set and R a relation defined in E
    -
    -

    Equivalence relationship :

    -
    +
    +

    Equivalence relationship :

    +

    We say that R is a relation of equivalence in E if its reflexive, symetrical and transitive

    -
    -

    Equivalence class :

    -
    +
    +

    Equivalence class :

    +

    Let R be a relation of equivalence in E and a ∈ E, we call equivalence class of a, and we write ̅a or ȧ, or cl a the following set :

    @@ -1546,8 +1547,8 @@ Let R be a relation of equivalence in E and a ∈ E, we call equivalence class o

      -
    • The quotient set :
      -
      +
    • The quotient set :
      +

      E/R = {̅a , a ∈ E}

      @@ -1556,9 +1557,9 @@ E/R = {̅a , a ∈ E}
    -
    -

    Order relationship :

    -
    +
    +

    Order relationship :

    +

    Let E be a set and R be a relation defined in E. We say that R is a relation of order if its reflexive, anti-symetrical and transitive.

    @@ -1567,9 +1568,9 @@ Let E be a set and R be a relation defined in E. We say that R is a relation of
  • The order R is called partial if ∃ x,y ∈ E xR̅y AND yR̅x
  • -
    -

    TODO Examples :

    -
    +
    +

    TODO Examples :

    +

    ∀x,y ∈ ℝ , xRy ⇔ x²-y²=x-y

    @@ -1581,17 +1582,17 @@ Let E be a set and R be a relation defined in E. We say that R is a relation of
    -
    -

    TP exercices Oct 20 :

    -
    +
    +

    TP exercices Oct 20 :

    +
    -
    -

    Exercice 3 :

    -
    +
    +

    Exercice 3 :

    +
    -
    -

    Question 3

    -
    +
    +

    Question 3

    +

    Montrer par l’absurde que P : ∀x ∈ ℝ*, √(4+x³) ≠ 2 + x³/4 est vraies

    @@ -1608,13 +1609,13 @@ x = 0 . Or, x appartiens a ℝ\{0}, donc P̅ est fausse. Ce qui est equivalent a
    -
    -

    Exercice 4 :

    -
    +
    +

    Exercice 4 :

    +
    -
    -

    DONE Question 1 :

    -
    +
    +

    DONE Question 1 :

    +

    ∀ n ∈ ℕ* , (n ,k=1)Σ1/k(k+1) = 1 - 1/1+n
    P(n) : (n ,k=1)Σ1/k(k+1) = 1 - 1/1+n
    @@ -1642,17 +1643,17 @@ De (a) et (b) on conclus que la proposition de départ est vraie

    -
    -

    Chapter 3 : Applications

    -
    +
    +

    Chapter 3 : Applications

    +
    -
    -

    3.1 Generalities about applications :

    -
    +
    +

    3.1 Generalities about applications :

    +
    -
    -

    Definition :

    -
    +
    +

    Definition :

    +

    Let E and F be two sets.

    @@ -1674,10 +1675,10 @@ f : E —> F
      -
    • Some examples :
      +
    • Some examples :
        -
      • Ex1:
        -
        +
      • Ex1:
        +

        f : ℝ —> ℝ
            x —> f(x) = (x-1)/x
        @@ -1685,8 +1686,8 @@ is a function, because 0 does NOT have a corresponding element using that relati

      • -
      • Ex2:
        -
        +
      • Ex2:
        +

        f : ℝ* —> ℝ
            x —> f(x)= (x-1)/x
        @@ -1698,9 +1699,9 @@ is, however, an application

    -
    -

    Restriction and prolongation of an application :

    -
    +
    +

    Restriction and prolongation of an application :

    +

    Let f : E -> F an application and E1 ⊂ E therefore :

    @@ -1712,8 +1713,8 @@ g is called the restriction of f to E1. And f is called the
      -
    • Example
      -
      +
    • Example
      +

      f : ℝ —> ℝ
          x —> f(x) = x2
      @@ -1727,9 +1728,9 @@ g is called the restriction of f to ℝ^{}. And f is called the

    -
    -

    Composition of applications :

    -
    +
    +

    Composition of applications :

    +

    Let E,F, and G be three sets, f: E -> F and g: F -> G are two applications. We define their composition, symbolized by gof as follow :

    @@ -1741,9 +1742,9 @@ gof : E -> G . ∀x ∈ E (gof)(x)= g(f(x))<
    -
    -

    3.2 Injection, surjection and bijection :

    -
    +
    +

    3.2 Injection, surjection and bijection :

    +

    Let f: E -> F be an application :

    @@ -1753,9 +1754,9 @@ Let f: E -> F be an application :
  • We say that if is bijective if it’s both injective and surjective at the same time.
  • -
    -

    Proposition :

    -
    +
    +

    Proposition :

    +

    Let f : E -> F be an application. Therefore:

    @@ -1767,21 +1768,21 @@ Let f : E -> F be an application. Therefore:
    -
    -

    3.3 Reciprocal applications :

    -
    +
    +

    3.3 Reciprocal applications :

    +
    -
    -

    Def :

    -
    +
    +

    Def :

    +

    Let f : E -> F a bijective application. So there exists an application named f-1 : F -> E such as : y = f(x) ⇔ x = f-1(y)

    -
    -

    Theorem :

    -
    +
    +

    Theorem :

    +

    Let f : E -> F be a bijective application. Therefore its reciprocal f-1 verifies : f-1of=IdE ; fof-1=IdF Or :

    @@ -1792,9 +1793,9 @@ IdE : E -> E ; x -> IdE(x) = x

    -
    -

    Some proprieties :

    -
    +
    +

    Some proprieties :

    +
    1. (f-1)-1 = f
    2. (gof)⁻¹ = f⁻¹og⁻¹
    3. @@ -1803,13 +1804,13 @@ IdE : E -> E ; x -> IdE(x) = x
    -
    -

    3.4 Direct Image and reciprocal Image :

    -
    +
    +

    3.4 Direct Image and reciprocal Image :

    +
    -
    -

    Direct Image :

    -
    +
    +

    Direct Image :

    +

    Let f: E-> F be an application and A ⊂ E. We call a direct image of A by f, and we symbolize as f(A) the subset of F defined by :

    @@ -1820,8 +1821,8 @@ f(A) = {f(x)/ x ∈ A} ; = { y ∈ F ∃ x ∈ A y=f(x)}

      -
    • Example :
      -
      +
    • Example :
      +

      f: ℝ -> ℝ
         x -> f(x) = x²
      @@ -1832,9 +1833,9 @@ f(A) = {f(0), f(4)} = {0, 16}

    -
    -

    Reciprocal image :

    -
    +
    +

    Reciprocal image :

    +

    Let f: E -> F be an application and B ⊂ F. We call the reciprocal image of E by F the subset f-1(B) :

    @@ -1845,8 +1846,8 @@ f-1(B) = {x ∈ E/f(x) ∈ B} ; x ∈ f-1(B) ⇔ f(x) ∈

    -
    -

    Exemples :

    -
    +
    +

    Exemples :

    +
      -
    • Exemple numéro 1:
      -
      +
    • Exemple numéro 1:
      +

      (ℝ , +, x) est un corps. Est ce la relation < est une relation d’ordre dans ℝ ?

      @@ -547,8 +547,8 @@ Non, pourquoi ? parce que elle est pas réflexive : ∀ x ∈ ℝ, x < x <

    • -
    • Exemple numéro 2:
      -
      +
    • Exemple numéro 2:
      +

      (ℝ , +, x) est un corps. Est ce la relation ≥ est une relation d’ordre dans ℝ ?

      @@ -563,13 +563,13 @@ Non, pourquoi ? parce que elle est pas réflexive : ∀ x ∈ ℝ, x < x <
    -
    -

    Majorant, minorant, borne supérieure, borne inférieure

    -
    +
    +

    Majorant, minorant, borne supérieure, borne inférieure

    +
    -
    -

    Majorant:

    -
    +
    +

    Majorant:

    +

    Soit E un sous-ensemble de ℝ (E ⊆ ℝ)

    @@ -580,9 +580,9 @@ Soit a ∈ ℝ, a est un majorant de E Si :∀ x ∈ E , x ≤ a

    -
    -

    Minorant:

    -
    +
    +

    Minorant:

    +

    Soit E un sous-ensemble de ℝ (E ⊆ ℝ)

    @@ -593,41 +593,41 @@ Soit b ∈ ℝ, b est un minorant de E Si :∀ x ∈ E , x ≥ b

    -
    -

    Borne supérieure:

    -
    +
    +

    Borne supérieure:

    +

    La borne supérieure est le plus petit des majorants Sup(E) = Borne supérieure

    -
    -

    Borne inférieure:

    -
    +
    +

    Borne inférieure:

    +

    La borne inférieure est le plus grand des minorant Inf(E) = Borne inférieure

    -
    -

    Maximum :

    -
    +
    +

    Maximum :

    +

    E ⊆ ℝ, a est un maximum de E (Max(E)) Si : a ∈ E ; ∀x ∈ E, x ≤ a.

    -
    -

    Minimum :

    -
    +
    +

    Minimum :

    +

    E ⊆ ℝ, b est un minimum de E (Min(E)) Si : b ∈ E ; ∀x ∈ E, x ≥ b.

    -
    -

    Remarques :

    -
    +
    +

    Remarques :

    +

    A et B deux ensembles bornés (Minoré et Majoré) :

    @@ -643,13 +643,13 @@ A et B deux ensembles bornés (Minoré et Majoré) :
    -
    -

    3rd cours :Les suites numériques Oct 5 :

    -
    +
    +

    3rd cours :Les suites numériques Oct 5 :

    +
    -
    -

    Définition :

    -
    +
    +

    Définition :

    +

    Soit (Un)n ∈ ℕ une suite numérique , (Un)n est une application de ℕ dans ℝ:

    @@ -670,8 +670,8 @@ n -—> U(n) = Un
      -
    • Exemple :
      -
      +
    • Exemple :
      +

      U : ℕ* -—> ℝ

      @@ -689,16 +689,16 @@ n -—> 1/n
    -
    -

    Définition N°2 :

    -
    +
    +

    Définition N°2 :

    +

    On peut définir une suite â partir d’une relation de récurrence entre deux termes successifs et le premier terme.

      -
    • Exemple :
      -
      +
    • Exemple :
      +

      U(n+1) = Un /2

      @@ -711,37 +711,37 @@ U(1)= 1
    -
    -

    Opérations sur les suites :

    -
    +
    +

    Opérations sur les suites :

    +
    -
    -

    La somme :

    -
    +
    +

    La somme :

    +

    Soient (Un) et (Vn) deux suites, la somme de (Un) et (Vn) est une suite de terme général Un + Vn

    -
    -

    Le produit :

    -
    +
    +

    Le produit :

    +

    Soient (Un)n et (Vn)n deux suites alors (Un) x (Vn) est une autre suite de terme général Un x Vn

    -
    -

    Inverse d’une suite :

    -
    +
    +

    Inverse d’une suite :

    +

    Soit Un une suite de terme général Un alors l’inverse de (Un) est une autre suite (Vn) = 1/(Un) de terme général de Vn = 1/Un

    -
    -

    Produit d’une suite par un scalaire :

    -
    +
    +

    Produit d’une suite par un scalaire :

    +

    Soit (Un) une suite de T.G Un

    @@ -753,17 +753,17 @@ Soit (Un) une suite de T.G Un
    -
    -

    Suite bornée :

    -
    +
    +

    Suite bornée :

    +

    Une suite (Un) est bornée si (Un) majorée et minorée

    -
    -

    Suite majorée :

    -
    +
    +

    Suite majorée :

    +

    Soit (Un) une suite

    @@ -774,9 +774,9 @@ U : (Un) est majorée par M ∈ ℝ ; ∀ n ∈ ℕ ; ∃ M ∈ ℝ , Un ≤ M
    -
    -

    Suite minorée :

    -
    +
    +

    Suite minorée :

    +

    Soit (Un) une suite

    @@ -787,13 +787,13 @@ U : (Un) est minorée par M ∈ ℝ ; ∀ n ∈ ℕ ; ∃ M ∈ ℝ , Un ≥ M
    -
    -

    Suites monotones :

    -
    +
    +

    Suites monotones :

    +
    -
    -

    Les suites croissantes :

    -
    +
    +

    Les suites croissantes :

    +

    Soit (Un)n est une suite

    @@ -804,9 +804,9 @@ Soit (Un)n est une suite

    -
    -

    Les suites décroissantes :

    -
    +
    +

    Les suites décroissantes :

    +

    Soit (Un)n est une suite

    @@ -819,45 +819,45 @@ Soit (Un)n est une suite
    -
    -

    Série TD N°1 : Oct 6

    -
    +
    +

    Série TD N°1 : Oct 6

    +
    -
    -

    Exo 1 :

    -
    +
    +

    Exo 1 :

    +
    -
    -

    Ensemble A :

    -
    +
    +

    Ensemble A :

    +

    A = {-1/n , n ∈ ℕ *}

      -
    • Borne inférieure
      -
      +
    • Borne inférieure
      +

      ∀ n ∈ ℕ* , -1/n ≥ -1 . -1 est la borne inférieure de l’ensemble A

    • -
    • Minimum :
      -
      +
    • Minimum :
      +

      ∀ n ∈ ℕ* , -1/n ≥ -1 . -1 est le Minimum de l’ensemble A

    • -
    • Borne supérieure :
      -
      +
    • Borne supérieure :
      +

      ∀ n ∈ ℕ* , -1/n ≤ 0 . 0 est la borne supérieure de l’ensemble A

    • -
    • Maximum :
      -
      +
    • Maximum :
      +

      L’ensemble A n’as pas de maximum

      @@ -865,16 +865,16 @@ L’ensemble A n’as pas de maximum
    -
    -

    Ensemble B :

    -
    +
    +

    Ensemble B :

    +

    B = [-1 , 3[ ∩ ℚ

      -
    • Borne inférieure :
      -
      +
    • Borne inférieure :
      +

      Inf(B) = Max(inf([-1 , 3[) , inf(ℚ))

      @@ -890,8 +890,8 @@ Puisse que ℚ n’as pas de Borne inférieure, donc par convention c’

    • -
    • Borne supérieure :
      -
      +
    • Borne supérieure :
      +

      Sup(B) = Min(sup([-1 ,3[) , sup(ℚ))

      @@ -907,15 +907,15 @@ Puisse que ℚ n’as pas de Borne supérieure, donc par convention c’

    • -
    • Minimum :
      -
      +
    • Minimum :
      +

      Min(B) = -1

    • -
    • Maximum :
      -
      +
    • Maximum :
      +

      L’ensemble B n’as pas de Maximum

      @@ -923,37 +923,37 @@ L’ensemble B n’as pas de Maximum
    -
    -

    Ensemble C :

    -
    +
    +

    Ensemble C :

    +

    C = {3n ,n ∈ ℕ}

      -
    • Borne inférieure :
      -
      +
    • Borne inférieure :
      +

      Inf(C) = 0

    • -
    • Borne supérieure :
      -
      +
    • Borne supérieure :
      +

      Sup(C) = +∞

    • -
    • Minimum :
      -
      +
    • Minimum :
      +

      Min(C) = 0

    • -
    • Maximum :
      -
      +
    • Maximum :
      +

      L’ensemble C n’as pas de Maximum

      @@ -961,37 +961,37 @@ L’ensemble C n’as pas de Maximum
    -
    -

    Ensemble D :

    -
    +
    +

    Ensemble D :

    +

    D = {1 - 1/n , n ∈ ℕ*}

      -
    • Borne inférieure :
      -
      +
    • Borne inférieure :
      +

      Inf(D)= 0

    • -
    • Borne supérieure :
      -
      +
    • Borne supérieure :
      +

      Sup(D)= 1

    • -
    • Minimum :
      -
      +
    • Minimum :
      +

      Min(D)= 0

    • -
    • Maximum :
      -
      +
    • Maximum :
      +

      L’ensemble D n’as pas de Maximum

      @@ -999,9 +999,9 @@ L’ensemble D n’as pas de Maximum
    -
    -

    Ensemble E :

    -
    +
    +

    Ensemble E :

    +

    E = { [2n + (-1)^n]/ n + 1 , n ∈ ℕ }

    @@ -1022,8 +1022,8 @@ E = { [2n + (-1)^n]/ n + 1 , n ∈ ℕ }

      -
    • Borne inférieure :
      -
      +
    • Borne inférieure :
      +

      Inf(E) = Min(inf(F), inf(G))

      @@ -1039,8 +1039,8 @@ Inf(F) = 1 ; Inf(G) = -1

    • -
    • Borne supérieure :
      -
      +
    • Borne supérieure :
      +

      Sup(E) = Max(sup(F), sup(G))

      @@ -1056,15 +1056,15 @@ sup(F) = +∞ ; sup(G) = +∞

    • -
    • Minimum :
      -
      +
    • Minimum :
      +

      Min(E)= -1

    • -
    • Maximum :
      -
      +
    • Maximum :
      +

      E n’as pas de maximum

      @@ -1073,20 +1073,20 @@ E n’as pas de maximum
    -
    -

    Exo 2 :

    -
    +
    +

    Exo 2 :

    +
    -
    -

    Ensemble A :

    -
    +
    +

    Ensemble A :

    +

    A = {x ∈ ℝ , 0 < x <√3}

      -
    • Borné
      -
      +
    • Borné
      +

      Oui, Inf(A)= 0 ; Sup(A)=√3

      @@ -1094,16 +1094,16 @@ A = {x ∈ ℝ , 0 < x <√3}
    -
    -

    Ensemble B :

    -
    +
    +

    Ensemble B :

    +

    B = { x ∈ ℝ , 1/2 < sin x <√3/2} ;

      -
    • Borné
      -
      +
    • Borné
      +

      ∀ x ∈ B, sin x > 1/2 ∴ Inf(B)= 1/2

      @@ -1116,16 +1116,16 @@ B = { x ∈ ℝ , 1/2 < sin x <√3/2} ;
    -
    -

    Ensemble C :

    -
    +
    +

    Ensemble C :

    +

    C = {x ∈ ℝ , x³ > 3}

      -
    • Minoré
      -
      +
    • Minoré
      +

      ∀ x ∈ C, x³ > 3 ∴ Inf(C)= 3

      @@ -1133,16 +1133,16 @@ C = {x ∈ ℝ , x³ > 3}
    -
    -

    Ensemble D :

    -
    +
    +

    Ensemble D :

    +

    D = {x ∈ ℝ , e^x < 1/2}

      -
    • Borné
      -
      +
    • Borné
      +

      ∀ x ∈ C, e^x > 0 ∴ Inf(C)= 0

      @@ -1155,16 +1155,16 @@ D = {x ∈ ℝ , e^x < 1/2}
    -
    -

    Ensemble E :

    -
    +
    +

    Ensemble E :

    +

    E = {x ∈ ℝ , ∃ p ∈ ℕ* : x = √2/p}

      -
    • Majoré
      -
      +
    • Majoré
      +

      p = √2/x . Donc : Sup(E)=1

      @@ -1173,16 +1173,16 @@ p = √2/x . Donc : Sup(E)=1
    -
    -

    Exo 3 :

    -
    +
    +

    Exo 3 :

    +

    U0 = 3/2 ; U(n+1) = (Un - 1)² + 1

    -
    -

    Question 1 :

    -
    +
    +

    Question 1 :

    +

    Montrer que : ∀ n ∈ ℕ , 1 < Un < 2 .

    @@ -1198,8 +1198,8 @@ Montrer que : ∀ n ∈ ℕ , 1 < Un < 2 .

      -
    • Raisonnement par récurrence :
      -
      +
    • Raisonnement par récurrence :
      +

      P(n) : ∀ n ∈ ℕ ; 1 < Un < 2

      @@ -1222,9 +1222,9 @@ On suppose que P(n) est vraie et on vérifie P(n+1) pour une contradiction
    -
    -

    Question 2 :

    -
    +
    +

    Question 2 :

    +

    Montrer que (Un)n est strictement monotone :

    @@ -1247,20 +1247,20 @@ On déduit que Un² - 3Un + 2 est négatif sur [1 , 2] et positif en deho
    -
    -

    4th cours (Suite) : Oct 10

    -
    +
    +

    4th cours (Suite) : Oct 10

    +
    -
    -

    Les suites convergentes

    -
    +
    +

    Les suites convergentes

    +

    Soit (Un)n est une suite convergente si lim Un n–> +∞ = l

    -
    -

    Remarque :

    -
    +
    +

    Remarque :

    +
    1. Un est une suite convergente alors Un est bornee
    2. Un est une suite convergente lim Un n—> +∞ = l ⇔ lim |Un| n—> +∞ = |l|
    3. @@ -1277,32 +1277,32 @@ Soit (Un)n est une suite convergente si lim Un n–> +∞ = l
    -
    -

    Theoreme d’encadrement

    -
    +
    +

    Theoreme d’encadrement

    +

    Soient Un Vn et Wn trois suites ∀n ∈ ℕ, Un ≤ Vn ≤ Wn . et lim Un n->∞ = lim Wn n-> +∞ = l ⇒ lim Vn n-> +∞ = l

    -
    -

    Suites arithmetiques

    -
    +
    +

    Suites arithmetiques

    +

    Un est une suite arithmetique si : U(n+1) = Un + r ; r etant la raison de la suite

    -
    -

    Forme general

    -
    +
    +

    Forme general

    +

    Un = U0 + nr ; Un = Up + (n - p)r

    -
    -

    Somme des n premiers termes

    -
    +
    +

    Somme des n premiers termes

    +

    Un est une suite arithmetique, Sn = [(U0 + Un)(n + 1)]/2

    @@ -1314,21 +1314,21 @@ Sn = (n, k = 0)ΣUk est une somme partielle et lim Sn n->+∞ = k≥0ΣUk est
    -
    -

    Suites géométriques

    -
    +
    +

    Suites géométriques

    +
    -
    -

    Forme general

    -
    +
    +

    Forme general

    +

    Un = U0 x r^n

    -
    -

    Somme des n premiers termes

    -
    +
    +

    Somme des n premiers termes

    +

    n ∈ ℕ\{1} Sn = U0 (1 - r^(n+1))/1-r

    @@ -1336,13 +1336,13 @@ n ∈ ℕ\{1} Sn = U0 (1 - r^(n+1))/1-r
    -
    -

    5th cours (suite) : Oct 12

    -
    +
    +

    5th cours (suite) : Oct 12

    +
    -
    -

    Suites adjacentes:

    -
    +
    +

    Suites adjacentes:

    +

    Soient (Un) et (Vn) deux suites, elles sont adjacentes si:

    @@ -1353,16 +1353,16 @@ Soient (Un) et (Vn) deux suites, elles sont adjacentes si:
    -
    -

    Suites extraites (sous-suites):

    -
    +
    +

    Suites extraites (sous-suites):

    +

    Soit (Un) une suite: ;U: ℕ -—> ℝ ; n -—> Un ;ϕ: ℕ -—> ℕ ; n -—> ϕn ;(U(ϕ(n))) est appelée une sous suite de (Un) ou bien une suite extraite.

    -
    -

    Remarques:

    -
    +
    +

    Remarques:

    +
    1. Si (Un) converge ⇒ ∀ n ∈ ℕ , U(ϕ(n)) converge aussi.
    2. Mais le contraire n’es pas toujours vrais.
    3. @@ -1371,25 +1371,25 @@ Soit (Un) une suite: ;U: ℕ -—> ℝ ; n -—> Un ;ϕ: ℕ -
    -
    -

    Suites de Cauchy:

    -
    +
    +

    Suites de Cauchy:

    +

    (Un) n ∈ ℕ est une suite de Cauchy Si ; ;∀ ε > 0 , ∃ N ∈ ℕ ; ∀ n > m > N ; |Un - Um| < ε

    -
    -

    Remarque :

    -
    +
    +

    Remarque :

    +
    1. Toute suite convergente est une suite de Cauchy et toute suite Cauchy est une suite convergente
    -
    -

    Théorème de Bolzano Weirstrass:

    -
    +
    +

    Théorème de Bolzano Weirstrass:

    +

    On peut extraire une sous suite convergente de toute suite bornée

    @@ -1399,7 +1399,7 @@ On peut extraire une sous suite convergente de toute suite bornée

    Author: Crystal

    -

    Created: 2023-11-01 Wed 20:10

    +

    Created: 2023-11-01 Wed 20:16

    \ No newline at end of file diff --git a/uni_notes/architecture.html b/uni_notes/architecture.html index cfdb462..290e923 100755 --- a/uni_notes/architecture.html +++ b/uni_notes/architecture.html @@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd"> - + Architecture 1 @@ -11,7 +11,7 @@ - +
    @@ -24,59 +24,59 @@

    Table of Contents

    -
    -

    Premier cours : Les systémes de numération Sep 27 :

    -
    +
    +

    Premier cours : Les systémes de numération Sep 27 :

    +

    Un système de numération est une méthode pour représenter des nombres à l’aide de symboles et de règles. Chaque système, comme le décimal (base 10) ou le binaire (base 2), utilise une base définie pour représenter des valeurs numériques. Il est caractérisé par 3 entitiés mathématiques importantes:

    @@ -97,9 +97,9 @@ Un système de numération est une méthode pour représenter des nombres à l&r
  • Des régles de représentations des nombres
  • -
    -

    Examples :

    -
    +
    +

    Examples :

    +

    B10 est un systéme de numération caractérisé par:

    @@ -127,16 +127,16 @@ A : 10 ; B : 11 ; C : 12 ; D : 13 ; E : 14 ; F : 15
    -
    -

    Comment passer d’un systéme a base 10 a un autre

    -
    +
    +

    Comment passer d’un systéme a base 10 a un autre

    +

    On symbolise un chiffre dans la base x par : (Nombre)x

    -
    -

    Pour les chiffres entiers :

    -
    +
    +

    Pour les chiffres entiers :

    +

    On fait une division successive, on prends le nombre 3257 comme exemple, on veut le faire passer d’une base décimale á une base 16:

    @@ -164,8 +164,8 @@ On dévise 3257 par 16, et les restants de la division serra la valeur en base16

      -
    • Conclusion:
      -
      +
    • Conclusion:
      +

      (3257)10 -—> (CB9)16

      @@ -173,9 +173,9 @@ On dévise 3257 par 16, et les restants de la division serra la valeur en base16
    -
    -

    Pour les chiffres non entiers :

    -
    +
    +

    Pour les chiffres non entiers :

    +

    On fait la division successive pour la partie entiére, et une multiplication successive pour la partie rationelle:

    @@ -228,13 +228,13 @@ On a déja la partie entiére donc on s’occupe de la partie aprés la virg
    -
    -

    2nd cours : Les systèmes de numération (Suite) Oct 3 :

    -
    +
    +

    2nd cours : Les systèmes de numération (Suite) Oct 3 :

    +
    -
    -

    Comment passer d’une base N a la base 10 :

    -
    +
    +

    Comment passer d’une base N a la base 10 :

    +

    Prenons comme exemple le nombre (11210,0011)3 , chaque chiffre dans ce nombre a un rang qui commence par 0 au premier chiffre (a gauche de la virgule) et qui augmente d’un plus qu’on avance a gauche, et diminue si on part a droite. Dans ce cas la :

    @@ -255,16 +255,16 @@ Et pour passer a la base 10, il suffit d’appliquer cette formule : Chif

    -
    -

    Comment passer d’une base N a une base N^(n) :

    -
    +
    +

    Comment passer d’une base N a une base N^(n) :

    +

    Si il ya une relation entre une base et une autre, on peut directement transformer vers cette base.

    -
    -

    Exemple :

    -
    +
    +

    Exemple :

    +

    Pour passer de la base 2 a la base 8 (8 qui est 2³) on découpe les chiffres 3 par 3

    @@ -376,13 +376,13 @@ Maintenant il suffit de trouver l’équivalent de la base2 en base8 :
    -
    -

    L’arithmétique binaire :

    -
    +
    +

    L’arithmétique binaire :

    +
    -
    -

    L’addition :

    -
    +
    +

    L’addition :

    +

    0 + 0 = 0 On retiens 0

    @@ -413,9 +413,9 @@ Donc 0110 + 1101 = 10011

    -
    -

    La soustraction :

    -
    +
    +

    La soustraction :

    +

    0 - 0 = 0 On emprunt = 0

    @@ -437,13 +437,13 @@ Donc 0110 + 1101 = 10011
    -
    -

    TP N°1 :

    -
    +
    +

    TP N°1 :

    +
    -
    -

    Exo1:

    -
    +
    +

    Exo1:

    +
    @@ -511,15 +511,15 @@ Donc 0110 + 1101 = 10011
      -
    • (10110,11)2
      -
      +
    • (10110,11)2
      +

      0 x 2° + 1 x 2¹ + 1 x 2² + 0 x 2³ + 1 x 2^(4) + 1 x 2¯¹ + 1 x 2¯² = (22.75)10

        -
      • (22,75)10 -—> (3)
        -
        +
      • (22,75)10 -—> (3)
        +

        22/3 = 7 R 1 ; 7/3 = 2 R 1 ; 2/3 = 0 R 2

        @@ -535,8 +535,8 @@ Donc 0110 + 1101 = 10011

      • -
      • (10110,11)2 -—> (8)
        -
        +
      • (10110,11)2 -—> (8)
        +

        8 = 2³ ; (010 110,110)2 -—> (?)8

        @@ -557,8 +557,8 @@ En utilisant le tableau 3bits :

      • -
      • (22,75)10 -—> (16)
        -
        +
      • (22,75)10 -—> (16)
        +

        22/16 = 1 R 6 ; 1/16 : 0 R F

        @@ -576,15 +576,15 @@ En utilisant le tableau 3bits :
    • -
    • (1254,1)8
      -
      +
    • (1254,1)8
      +

      4 x 8° + 5 x 8¹ + 2 x 8² + 1 x 8³ + 1 x 8¯¹ = (684,125)10

        -
      • (1254,1)8 -—> (?)2
        -
        +
      • (1254,1)8 -—> (?)2
        +

        En utilisant le tableau 3bits :

        @@ -600,8 +600,8 @@ En utilisant le tableau 3bits :

      • -
      • (684,125)10 -—> (?)3
        -
        +
      • (684,125)10 -—> (?)3
        +

        684/3 = 228 R 0 ; 228/3 = 76 R 0 ; 76/3 = 25 R 1 ; 25/3 = 8 R 1 ; 8/3 = 2 R 2 ; 2/3 = 0 R 2

        @@ -617,8 +617,8 @@ En utilisant le tableau 3bits :

      • -
      • (684,125)10 -—> (?)16
        -
        +
      • (684,125)10 -—> (?)16
        +

        684/16 = 42 R C ; 42/16 = 2 R A ; 2/16 0 R 2

        @@ -636,15 +636,15 @@ En utilisant le tableau 3bits :
    • -
    • (F5B,A)16
      -
      +
    • (F5B,A)16
      +

      11 x 16° + 5 x 16 + 15 x 16² + 10 x 16¯¹ = (3931,625)10

        -
      • (3931,625)10 -—> (8)
        -
        +
      • (3931,625)10 -—> (8)
        +

        3931/8 = 491 R 3 ; 491/8 = 61 R 3 ; 61/8 = 7 R 5 ; 7/8 = 0 R 7

        @@ -660,8 +660,8 @@ En utilisant le tableau 3bits :

      • -
      • (7533,5)8 -—> (2)
        -
        +
      • (7533,5)8 -—> (2)
        +

        En utilisant le tableau 3bits

        @@ -671,8 +671,8 @@ En utilisant le tableau 3bits

      • -
      • (3931,625)10 -—> (3)
        -
        +
      • (3931,625)10 -—> (3)
        +

        3931/3 = 1310 R 1 ; 1310/3 = 436 R 2 ; 436/3 = 145 R 1 ; 145/3 = 48 R 1 ; 48/3 = 16 R 0 ; 16/3 = 5 R 1 ; 5/3 = 1 R 2 ; 1/3 = 0 R 1

        @@ -690,8 +690,8 @@ En utilisant le tableau 3bits
    • -
    • (52,38)10
      -
      +
    • (52,38)10
      +

      52/2 = 26 R 0 ; 26/2 = 13 R 0 ; 13/2 = 6 R 1 ; 6/2 = 3 R 0 ; 3/2 = 1 R 1 ; 1/2 = 0 R 1

      @@ -707,8 +707,8 @@ En utilisant le tableau 3bits

        -
      • (52,38)10 -—> (3)
        -
        +
      • (52,38)10 -—> (3)
        +

        52/3 = 17 R 1 ; 17/3 = 5 R 2 ; 5/3 = 1 R 2 ; 1/3 = 0 R 1

        @@ -724,8 +724,8 @@ En utilisant le tableau 3bits

      • -
      • (110100,011)2 -—> (8)
        -
        +
      • (110100,011)2 -—> (8)
        +

        En utilisant le tableau 3bits:

        @@ -736,8 +736,8 @@ En utilisant le tableau 3bits:

      • -
      • (52,38)10 -—> (16)
        -
        +
      • (52,38)10 -—> (16)
        +

        52/16 = 3 R 4 ; 3/16 = 0 R 3

        @@ -755,15 +755,15 @@ En utilisant le tableau 3bits:
    • -
    • (23,5)3
      -
      +
    • (23,5)3
      +

      3 x 3° + 2 x 3 + 5 x 3¯¹ = (10.67)10

        -
      • (10,67)10 -—> (2)
        -
        +
      • (10,67)10 -—> (2)
        +

        10/2 = 5 R 0 ; 5/2 = 2 R 1 ; 2/2 = 1 R 0 ; 1/2 = 0 R 1

        @@ -779,8 +779,8 @@ En utilisant le tableau 3bits:

      • -
      • (001 010,101)2 -—> (8)
        -
        +
      • (001 010,101)2 -—> (8)
        +

        Ô Magic 3bits table, save me soul, me children and me maiden:

        @@ -791,8 +791,8 @@ En utilisant le tableau 3bits:

      • -
      • (10,67)10 -—> (16)
        -
        +
      • (10,67)10 -—> (16)
        +

        10/16 = 0 R A

        @@ -812,13 +812,13 @@ En utilisant le tableau 3bits:
    -
    -

    Exo2:

    -
    +
    +

    Exo2:

    +
      -
    • (34)? = (22)10
      -
      +
    • (34)? = (22)10
      +

      (34)a = (22)10 ; 4 x a° + 3 x a = 22 ; 4 + 3a = 22 ; 3a = 18

      @@ -829,8 +829,8 @@ En utilisant le tableau 3bits:

    • -
    • (75)? = (117)10
      -
      +
    • (75)? = (117)10
      +

      (75)b = (117)10 ; 5 x b° + 7 x b¹ = 117 ; 5 + 7b = 117 ; 7b = 112

      @@ -843,27 +843,27 @@ En utilisant le tableau 3bits:
    -
    -

    Exo3:

    -
    +
    +

    Exo3:

    +
      -
    • (101011)2 + (111011)2
      -
      +
    • (101011)2 + (111011)2
      +

      101011 + 111011 = 1100110

    • -
    • (1011,1101)2 + (11,1)2
      -
      +
    • (1011,1101)2 + (11,1)2
      +

      1011,1101 + 11,1000 = 1111,0101

    • -
    • (1010,0101)2 - (110,1001)2
      -
      +
    • (1010,0101)2 - (110,1001)2
      +

      1010,0101 - 110,1001 = 11,1100

      @@ -872,13 +872,13 @@ En utilisant le tableau 3bits:
    -
    -

    L’arithmétique binaire (Suite): Oct 4

    -
    +
    +

    L’arithmétique binaire (Suite): Oct 4

    +
    -
    -

    La multiplication :

    -
    +
    +

    La multiplication :

    +

    0 x 0 = 0

    @@ -899,9 +899,9 @@ En utilisant le tableau 3bits:

    -
    -

    La division :

    -
    +
    +

    La division :

    +

    On divise de la manière la plus normale du monde !!!

    @@ -909,49 +909,49 @@ On divise de la manière la plus normale du monde !!!
    -
    -

    4th cours : Le codage Oct 10

    -
    +
    +

    4th cours : Le codage Oct 10

    +
    -
    -

    Le codage des entiers positifs

    -
    +
    +

    Le codage des entiers positifs

    +

    Le codage sur n bits permet de representer tout les entiers naturels compris entre [0, 2^n - 1]. On peut coder sur 8bits les entiers entre [0;2^8 - 1(255)]

    -
    -

    Le codage des nombres relatifs

    -
    +
    +

    Le codage des nombres relatifs

    +
    -
    -

    Remarque

    -
    +
    +

    Remarque

    +

    Quelque soit le codage utilise, par convention le dernier bit est reserve pour le signe. ou 1 est negatif et 0 est positif.

    -
    -

    Le codage en signe + valeur absolue (SVA):

    -
    +
    +

    Le codage en signe + valeur absolue (SVA):

    +

    Avec n bits le n eme est reserve au signe : [-(2^n-1)-1 , 2^n-1 -1]. Sur 8bits [-127, 127]

    -
    -

    Codage en compliment a 1 (CR):

    -
    +
    +

    Codage en compliment a 1 (CR):

    +

    On obtiens le compliment a 1 d’un nombre binaire en inversant chaqu’un de ses bits (1 -> 0 et 0-> 1) les nombres positifs sont la meme que SVA (il reste tel qu’il est)

    -
    -

    Codage en compliment a 2 (CV):

    -
    +
    +

    Codage en compliment a 2 (CV):

    +

    C’est literallement CR + 1 pour les negatifs et SVA pour les nombres positifs

    @@ -962,7 +962,7 @@ C’est literallement CR + 1 pour les negatifs et SVA pour les nombres posit

    Author: Crystal

    -

    Created: 2023-11-01 Wed 20:10

    +

    Created: 2023-11-01 Wed 20:16

    \ No newline at end of file